Georgie Ndirangu is a former producer and anchor at CNBC Rwanda and actuarial science graduate. He currently works as a business reporter with BBC Africa.

Known for his bespoke suits and fashion sense, Ndirangu talked to PDOnline about his style.

What did you want to be when you grew up and how does anchoring fit into that?

In primary school I wanted to be a doctor as does everyone else. (He says with a chuckle). In secondary school I wanted to be a pilot.

I ended up doing actuarial science and the math now fits into what I do as a journalist because it helps with analysis for the business team and research.

I feel that I also have an advantage as communicating numbers and noticing trends in numerical data is easier with my background.

You are a polymath with interests ranging from financial reporting to fashion. Where do these two  intersect?

Fashion is a lifestyle. Everything you do, you have to do it with a certain level of poise and style with a keen eye on aesthetics for the best delivery possible.

 You were once a commercial model and owner of a fashion house 2Die4. What skills and learnings did you get from that?

I realised that it’s ok for things to evolve and no longer exist. As you grow or move in life, allow your skin to shed and embrace new opportunities and new challenges.

Letting go of people, is sometimes the hardest to do but it is necessary. I also learnt that perception is everything, but as long as your social media posts are not too far from who you are as a person, you’ll never have a problem with consistency or authenticity.

How can you describe your personal style and do you think it has evolved in any way?

My personal style is eclectic. It has evolved as my body changes and as I get older.

I like things that accentuate my skin, shoulders, chest, and arms more. Before it was just about what I was wearing, now it’s about how I feel when I dress up.

Do you have any style icons and if so who?

I have a few style gods I normally check out from time to time: basketballer Russell Westbrook, F1 racer – Lewis Hamilton, and Congolese singer – Fally Ipupa.

You are known for having a well-defined six-pack. How does physical fitness and wellness fit into your fashion and work?

I’ll just tell you here and now – full disclosure, I’m getting a dad-body without being a dad. Lol.

The pack’s not exactly six, but yes, trying to stay lean. I like to play sports, stay toned and on my feet.

My girlfriend made me like yoga, I’m slowly getting the hang of it. And there’s home workouts now, thrice a week that help with staying sane and fitting in a bit of exercise while still working.

For me exercise and wellness replenish my energy and ensure I’m in the best possible frame of mind and body to enjoy whatever I’m doing at the moment, be it work, or just a simple sit-down with family.

Any movement that I can squeeze in is more preferable to none, especially on crazy shot days.

 If you were to give just one piece of fashion advice, what would it be?

Most of the people who push brands online, where we get most of our inspiration are paid to wear those clothes.

So, don’t go broke or break your bank to showcase your style and fashion on social media. Stay on a budget.

You can also partner with companies, if not, allow yourself to feel comfortable in clothes because of their feel, not necessarily their brand. You can still rock it within your budget.

 How does the fashion scene in Kenya and Rwanda compare?

Funny thing, Rwanda has a lot of ‘sapeur’ influence, since it is a francophone country.

So its fashion scene is amazingly distinct. Kenya’s fashion scene, however, is a lot broader, with things like Polo events and outdoor mingling socials allowing people to dress up during the day in haute couture and other highly stylized fashion pieces. We all know what social events mean fashion-wise right?

 What motto do you live by? 

No matter how successful you are, stay grounded, stay humble, stay prayerful. Remember a ladder goes both ways…up and down.