Kenyan nanny Rosie Samson, also known as Rozah Rozalina Samson, has addressed suggestions that her employers exploited her for the sake of online attention and recognition.

Over the weekend, Rosie became a global sensation when a TikTok video, shared by her employers, showcased an emotional farewell with the four children she had cared for in Lebanon including the internet-famous twins Maria and Cataleya.

In a tearful goodbye at the airport, the parents found it difficult to separate the children from Rosie. Even with assurances of her eventual return, the kids clung tightly to their beloved nanny, creating a poignant moment.

“Thank you, Rosie, for caring for our babies like they’re yours,” the parents said.

Days before her departure, the family also commemorated Rosie’s birthday with an extravagant celebration.

“Thank you so much. You are a great person and you are part of our family,” the father says in the video. He also implored Rosie to ensure her return, saying, “We can’t survive without you.”

The emotional airport goodbye elicited netizens’ admiration for the evident strong bond between Rosie and the children. However, another section raised questions about the motivations behind sharing such a personal moment on social media, suggesting the possibility of her employers using her for fame.

Addressing the speculations, Rosie took to YouTube to defend her employers.

She affirmed that her employers had consistently demonstrated genuine care and kindness towards her, emphasizing that this was true even before the video gained viral attention.

“Today I want to address an issue that I have come across that is disturbing me. For those people who are saying that my bosses are using me and that they are faking tears, it is not true. Those people loved me from the day I went there. They accepted me and treated me very well from day one. In fact, I blended in from day one,” Rosie said.

 

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A post shared by Jinan abou taam (@maria_and_cataleya)


Rosie also clarified that her employers were already well-known before her arrival, dispelling any notions that they sought fame through her or exploited her for publicity.

“Those people who are saying they are looking for likes. It’s not true; those people were famous even before I came back to Kenya. I do not know where that is coming from,” she explained.

Reflecting on her time in Lebanon, Rosie acknowledged the challenges faced by migrant workers in foreign countries. She expressed her hope for improved conditions for individuals working abroad.

“When I was in Lebanon, I always prayed that we who work there should at least have something different. It was so heartbreaking kuona mtu ameuliwa, mtu anateswa. It was very sad,” she said.