Kenya has become the 10th country worldwide and the 2nd in Africa to be designated as the Regional Centre for Training Radiation Professionals for English-Speaking countries.

In a celebration of this significant achievement in nuclear safety, Kenya inaugurated the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Postgraduate Education Course in Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources for English-speaking countries on Monday.

At the launch held at Kenyatta University, Mary Muthoni, the Principal Secretary for the State Department for Public Health and Professional Standards, emphasized the crucial significance of the course. She underscored its importance considering the diverse applications of radiation sources in contemporary life, encompassing medical diagnostics, industry, agriculture, and energy generation.

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) estimates that there are over 500,000 sealed radiation sources globally, with a notable rise in diagnostic radiology procedures in Africa.

The Principal Secretary also underscored Kenya’s commitment to Universal Health Coverage (UHC), which has resulted in a growing demand for healthcare services, including equipment emitting radiation.

She emphasized the imperative need for stringent radiation protection measures.

Kenya has already enacted the Radiation Protection Act and the Nuclear Regulatory Act, showcasing its commitment to nuclear safety in alignment with international agreements.

The launch of the IAEA postgraduate course in radiation protection signifies a significant advancement, offering training to 22 students from 13 countries and contributing to the global cohort of over 2,200 graduates.