Kenyan learners may soon have to learn how to detect bombs is a new Bill is passed in parliament.

Introduced by Turkana Woman Representative Joyce Emanikor, the Kena Institute of Curriculum Development (Amendment)Bill, 2019, seeks to reduce the risk posed by bombs, especially improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

According to a report by the Star newspaper, the bill will also compel Kenyan schools to teach students about anti-terrorism and how to respond in case of a terror attack.

Emanikor is hoping the Bill will provide students with a foundation to think fast, think ahead and prepare for deadly situations like the massacre at Garissa University, reports the publication.

If enacted into law, the school curriculum will be expanded to include lessons on drills, evacuations, first aid, how to locate explosives, how to sense danger and react, among other safety-related teachings.

“It will incorporate personal safety, self-defense, demonstrations on security drills, first aid, detection and response to weapons and evacuation procedure in curriculum development,” the bill reads.

The Bill is being discussed in the Education Committee before it is taken back to the floor of the House for a second reading.

Additionally, the Bill seeks to incorporate psychosocial skills and strengthen guidance and counselling. Training will address psychological, emotional problems or disorders that undermine learners’ ability to interact appropriately.

The training will also cover learners in conflict-prone areas, such as those who have experienced cattle rustling, terror, inter-communal conflicts and family disputes.

“Things like family disputes might seem a small thing and normal in some setups. But they greatly affect learners that’s why there is need to have a subject that will address such issues and help children grow informed on better ways to address and deal with situations,” Education Committee chairman Julius Melly told the Star.